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Available copies

  • 0 of 2 copies available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 0 of 2 copies available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 2 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Detroit Lakes Public Library E L (Text) 33500013256946 New Checked out 12/18/2020
Moorhead Public Library E L (Text) 33500013256938 New Checked out 12/09/2020

Record details

  • ISBN: 1250203554
  • ISBN: 9781250203557
  • Physical Description: 40 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
    print
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York, NY : Roaring Brook Press, 2020.

Content descriptions

General Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Summary, etc.: Water is the first medicine. It affects and connects us all... When a black snake threatens to destroy the Earth and poison her people's water, one young water protector takes a stand to defend Earth's most sacred resource. Inspired by the many indigenous-led movements across North America, this bold and lyrical picture book issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth's water from harm and corruption.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2020 February #1
    *Starred Review* An Indigenous girl explains why water is sacred, before she speaks of the foretold "black snake that will destroy the land," referring to the polluting oil pipelines that course through the earth. The girl then casts fear aside, crying, "Take courage!" as she marches forward, rallying her people to defend their village and their planet. Goade's watercolor illustrations fill the spreads with streaming ribbons of water, cosmic backdrops, and lush natural landscapes, sometimes intercut by the harsh red that comes with the black snake—depicted literally, towering over people of many nations, who link hands in solidarity. Lindstrom's spare, poetic text flows with the "river's rhythm," periodically stopping to beat out the refrain, "We stand / With our songs / And our drums. / We are still here." Written in response to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, famously protested by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and others, these pages carry grief, but it is overshadowed by hope in what is an unapologetic call to action. While the text draws on specific cultural beliefs, its argument is universal: "We are stewards of the Earth." Back matter includes notes from both author and illustrator, and the final page offers a pledge that readers may choose to recite, sign, and date to affirm their commitment to the cause. A beautiful tribute and powerful manifesto. Grades K-2. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2020 February #1
    *Starred Review* An Indigenous girl explains why water is sacred, before she speaks of the foretold "black snake that will destroy the land," referring to the polluting oil pipelines that course through the earth. The girl then casts fear aside, crying, "Take courage!" as she marches forward, rallying her people to defend their village and their planet. Goade's watercolor illustrations fill the spreads with streaming ribbons of water, cosmic backdrops, and lush natural landscapes, sometimes intercut by the harsh red that comes with the black snake—depicted literally, towering over people of many nations, who link hands in solidarity. Lindstrom's spare, poetic text flows with the "river's rhythm," periodically stopping to beat out the refrain, "We stand / With our songs / And our drums. / We are still here." Written in response to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, famously protested by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and others, these pages carry grief, but it is overshadowed by hope in what is an unapologetic call to action. While the text draws on specific cultural beliefs, its argument is universal: "We are stewards of the Earth." Back matter includes notes from both author and illustrator, and the final page offers a pledge that readers may choose to recite, sign, and date to affirm their commitment to the cause. A beautiful tribute and powerful manifesto. Grades K-2. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Carole Lindstrom is Anishinabe/Métis and is a proud member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe Indians. She was born and raised in Nebraska and currently makes her home in Maryland. She is the author of Girls Dance, Boys Fiddle.

Michaela Goade is an artist and graphic designer living and working in Juneau, Alaska, where she was also raised. Forever inspired by the coastal wilds of Southeast Alaska, she works to capture its magic and honor its vibrant cultures. Michaela is from the Raven moiety and Kiks.ádi Clan from Sitka, Alaska. She has illustrated Encounter (Brittany Luby) and Raven and the Tide Lady.

Subject: Water conservation
JUVENILE FICTION / Legends, Myths, Fables / Native American
JUVENILE FICTION / Nature & the Natural World / Environment
JUVENILE FICTION / People & Places / United States / Native American
Water conservation Fiction
Indians of North America Juvenile fiction
Myth Juvenile fiction
Water conservation Juvenile fiction
Genre: Mythological fiction.
Picture books.
Fiction.
Juvenile works.
Fiction.
Picture books for children.
Search Results Showing Item 1 of 1 Preferred library: Lake Agassiz Regional Library?

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