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An indigenous peoples' history of the United States for young people

Mendoza, Jean (author.). Reese, Debbie, 1959- (author.). Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne, 1938- Adaptation of (work): Indigenous peoples' history of the United States. (Added Author).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Roseau Public Library ya 970.0049 MEN (Text) 35500006274367 Main Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 0807049395
  • ISBN: 9780807049396
  • Physical Description: ix, 270 pages : illustrations, maps ; 21 cm
    print
  • Publisher: Boston, Massachusetts : Beacon Press, [2019]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note: Introduction: This land -- Follow the corn -- Culture of conquest -- Cult of the covenant -- Bloody footprints -- The birth of a nation -- Jefferson, Jackson, and the pursuit of indigenous homelands -- Sea to shining sea -- Indigenous lands become "Indian country" -- The persistence of sovereignty -- Indigenous action, indigenous rights -- "Water is life": indigenous resistance in the twenty-first century.
Summary, etc.: "Historian Robin D. G. Kelley called it "the most important US history book you will read in your lifetime," and former Navajo Nation president Peterson Zah declared it "an indispensable text for students of all ages." Upon publication, An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States shattered our understanding of the United States as a land "discovered" in the "New World." This young readers' edition continues that re-education by accessibly challenging the Doctrine of Discovery, Manifest Destiny, and the myth of the US as a "nation of immigrants." Here, readers will learn about the ongoing Indigenous genocide often omitted from textbooks, the role colonialism played in forming the US, and the many ways Native Americans have actively resisted US imperialism for centuries. Fully adapted, the text includes discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage young people and readers of all ages to think critically about their own place in history. Spanning more than four hundred years, An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States for Young People radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative."--Back cover.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2019 June #1
    *Starred Review* This adaptation of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States (2014) should be required reading for all middle and high schoolers—and their teachers. Dunbar-Ortiz's scrutinous accounts of Indigenous histories are well-known among history buffs, and in this revision by Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, the same level of detail is maintained while still accommodating a teenage audience. From start to finish, they tell a story of resistance to the strategically brutal removal of Native peoples from sea to shining sea, a result of settler colonial policies. There is much to commend here: the lack of sugar-coating, the debunking of origin stories, the linking between ideology and actions, the well-placed connections among events past and present, the quotes from British colonizers and American presidents that leave no doubt as to their violent intentions. Built-in prompts call upon readers to reflect and think critically about their own prior knowledge. Terms like "settler" and "civilization" are called into question. Text is broken up by maps, photographs, images by Native artists, propaganda, and primary-source texts that provide more evidence of the depth to which the US economy was—and still is—rooted in the destruction of Indigenous lives. The resistance continues, and this book urges all readers to consider their own roles, whether as bystanders or upstanders. Grades 7-12. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz has been active in the international Indigenous movement for more than four decades and is known for her lifelong commitment to national and international social justice issues. She lives in San Francisco.

Debbie Reese is an educator and founder of American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL). She is tribally enrolled at Nambe Owingeh, a federally recognized tribe, and grew up on Nambe&;s reservation. She holds a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Illinois.

Jean Mendoza is a curriculum specialist focusing on the representation of Indigenous peoples in children&;s and young adult literature. She holds a PhD in curriculum and instruction and an M.Ed in early childhood education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Subject: Indians of North America Historiography Juvenile literature
Indians of North America Colonization Juvenile literature
Indians, Treatment of United States History Juvenile literature
United States Colonization Juvenile literature
United States Race relations Juvenile literature
United States Politics and government Juvenile literature
Indians of North America Historiography
Indians of North America Colonization
Indians, Treatment of United States History
United States Colonization
United States Race relations
United States Politics and government
Search Results Showing Item 1 of 10 Preferred library: Lake Agassiz Regional Library?

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