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Crime and punishment / Fyodor Dostoevsky ; translated from the Russian by Constance Garnett ; with an introduction by Ernest J. Simmons.

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Available copies

  • 4 of 4 copies available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 4 of 4 copies available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 4 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Breckenridge Public Library DOS (Text) 33500009083262 Main Available -
Detroit Lakes Public Library DOS (Text) 33500009083254 Main Available -
Moorhead Public Library DOS (Text) 33500009083247 Main Available -
Moorhead Public Library Dos (Text) 33500005548813 Main Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780679601005
  • ISBN: 0679601007 :
  • Physical Description: xxiv, 629 p. ; 20 cm.
  • Edition: Modern Library ed.
  • Publisher: New York : Modern Library, 1994.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. xxiii-xxiv).
Summary, etc.: Raskolnikov commits murder. He then must deal both with the police, and his own guilty conscience. Determined to overreach his humanity and assert his untrammelled individual will, Raskolnikov, an impoverished student living in the St. Petersburg of the Tsars, commits an act of murder and theft and sets into motion a story which, for its excrutiating suspense, its atmospheric vividness, and its profundity of characterization and vision, is almost unequaled in the literatures of the world. The best known of Dostoevsky's masterpieces, Crime and Punishment can bear any amount of rereading without losing a drop of its power over our imagination.
Author Notes

Fyodor Mikailovich Dostoevsky’s life was as dark and dramatic as the great novels he wrote. He was born in Moscow in 1821. A short first novel, Poor Folk (1846) brought him instant success, but his writing career was cut short by his arrest for alleged subversion against Tsar Nicholas I in 1849. In prison he was given the “silent treatment” for eight months (guards even wore velvet soled boots) before he was led in front a firing squad. Dressed in a death shroud, he faced an open grave and awaited execution, when suddenly, an order arrived commuting his sentence. He then spent four years at hard labor in a Siberian prison, where he began to suffer from epilepsy, and he returned to St. Petersburg only a full ten years after he had left in chains.

His prison experiences coupled with his conversion to a profoundly religious philosophy formed the basis for his great novels. But it was his fortuitous marriage to Anna Snitkina, following a period of utter destitution brought about by his compulsive gambling, that gave Dostoevsky the emotional stability to complete Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1868-69), The Possessed (1871-72),and The Brothers Karamazov (1879-80). When Dostoevsky died in 1881, he left a legacy of masterworks that influenced the great thinkers and writers of the Western world and immortalized him as a giant among writers of world literature.

Subject: Saint Petersburg (Russia) > Fiction.
Genre: Psychological fiction.
Mystery fiction.

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