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Cold warriors : writers who waged the literary cold war / Duncan White.

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Moorhead Public Library 809.9335 WHI (Text) 33500013127626 New Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780062449818
  • ISBN: 0062449818
  • Physical Description: xi, 782 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Custom House/HarperCollins Publishers ; [2019]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 697-754) and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
SPAIN: Orwell & Koestler, 1937 -- TRIALS: Babel, McCarthy, 1934-39 -- WAR: Philby, Greene, Hemingway, Orwell & Koestler, 1934-45 -- DIVISION: Orwell, McCarthy, Akhamatova, Koestler, Fast, Spender & Philby, 1945-57 -- ESCALATION: Greene, Solzhenitsyn, Wright, Pasternak, 1950-60 -- CRISIS: Greene, LeCarré, 1957-63 -- RECKONING: Sinyavsky, Spender, McCarthy, 1964-72 -- UNRAVELING: Solzhenitsyn, Belli, Havel, 1968-91.
Summary, etc.:
"A brilliant, invigorating account of the great writers on both sides of the Iron Curtain who played the dangerous games of espionage, dissidence and subversion that changed the course of the Cold War. During the Cold War, literature was both sword and noose. Novels, essays and poems could win the hearts and minds of those caught between the competing creeds of capitalism and communism. They could also lead to exile, imprisonment or execution if they offended those in power. The clandestine intelligence services of the United States, Britain and the Soviet Union had secret agents and vast propaganda networks devoted to literary warfare. But the battles were personal, too: friends turning on each other, lovers cleaved by political fissures, artists undermined by inadvertent complicities. In Cold Warriors, Harvard University's Duncan White vividly chronicles how this ferocious intellectual struggle was waged on both sides of the Iron Curtain. The book has at its heart five major writers--George Orwell, Stephen Spender, Mary McCarthy, Graham Greene and Andrei Sinyavsky--but the full cast includes a dazzling array of giants, among them Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, John le Carré, Richard Wright, Ernest Hemingway, Boris Pasternak, Gioconda Belli, Arthur Koestler, Vaclav Havel, Joan Didion, Isaac Babel, Howard Fast, Lillian Hellman, Mikhail Sholokhov --and scores more. Spanning decades and continents and spectacularly meshing gripping narrative with perceptive literary detective work, Cold Warriors is a welcome reminder that, at a moment when ignorance is celebrated and reading seen as increasingly irrelevant, writers and books can change the world."--Amazon.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2019 August #1
    *Starred Review* In 1948, when Arthur Koestler tried to punch Jean-Paul Sartre in a Paris bar but ended up blackening the eye of Albert Camus instead, bystanders saw only a scuffle between angry men. White, however, recognizes a skirmish in an ideological war pitting authors defending democratic capitalism against writers supporting Soviet communism. From this painstakingly researched narrative, readers will learn about how George Orwell, Stephen Spender, Mary McCarthy, Graham Greene, Andrei Sinyavsky, and many others (including Koestler and Sartre) deployed their skills on the Cold War's most hotly contested literary battlefields. Readers see how Orwell distilled his hard-won insights into Soviet perfidy into the pellucid fable Animal Farm, how McCarthy was launched on an ideological crusade by a single question from James Farrell, how Sinyavsky inspired an unprecedented public protest in Moscow by defying Soviet censors in the name of literary autonomy. White illuminates the precarious place of literature in a world swarming with spies eager to manipulate—even to enlist—authors to advance their shadowy agendas. Readers witness the ruthless brutality of Soviet authorities imprisoning and executing dissident writers, but they also penetrate the deceptions of American and British intelligence agencies playing authors as pawns. A compelling reminder of literature's influence—and vulnerability—in a world of power politics. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2019 August #1
    *Starred Review* In 1948, when Arthur Koestler tried to punch Jean-Paul Sartre in a Paris bar but ended up blackening the eye of Albert Camus instead, bystanders saw only a scuffle between angry men. White, however, recognizes a skirmish in an ideological war pitting authors defending democratic capitalism against writers supporting Soviet communism. From this painstakingly researched narrative, readers will learn about how George Orwell, Stephen Spender, Mary McCarthy, Graham Greene, Andrei Sinyavsky, and many others (including Koestler and Sartre) deployed their skills on the Cold War's most hotly contested literary battlefields. Readers see how Orwell distilled his hard-won insights into Soviet perfidy into the pellucid fable Animal Farm, how McCarthy was launched on an ideological crusade by a single question from James Farrell, how Sinyavsky inspired an unprecedented public protest in Moscow by defying Soviet censors in the name of literary autonomy. White illuminates the precarious place of literature in a world swarming with spies eager to manipulate—even to enlist—authors to advance their shadowy agendas. Readers witness the ruthless brutality of Soviet authorities imprisoning and executing dissident writers, but they also penetrate the deceptions of American and British intelligence agencies playing authors as pawns. A compelling reminder of literature's influence—and vulnerability—in a world of power politics. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Subject: Espionage in literature.
Literature, Modern > 20th century > History and criticism.
Cold War in literature.
Politics and literature.
Authors > 20th century > Biography.
HISTORY / Modern / 20th Century.
POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / General.
LITERARY CRITICISM / Modern / 20th Century.
Authors.
Cold War (1945-1989) in literature.
Espionage in literature.
Literature, Modern.
Politics and literature.
Genre: Biography.
Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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