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Because internet : understanding the new rules of language / Gretchen McCulloch.

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Moorhead Public Library 302.231 MCC (Text) 33500013113550 New Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780735210936
  • ISBN: 0735210934
  • Physical Description: 326 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Publisher: New York, NY : Riverhead Books, 2019.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 278-316) and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
Informal writing -- Language and society -- Internet people -- Typographical tone of voice -- Emoji and other internet gestures - How conversations change -- Memes and internet culture.
Summary, etc.:
"A linguistically informed look at how our digital world is transforming the English language. Language is humanity's most spectacular open-source project, and the internet is making our language change faster and in more interesting ways than ever before. Internet conversations are structured by the shape of our apps and platforms, from the grammar of status updates to the protocols of comments and @replies. Linguistically inventive online communities spread new slang and jargon with dizzying speed. What's more, social media is a vast laboratory of unedited, unfiltered words where we can watch language evolve in real time. Even the most absurd-looking slang has genuine patterns behind it. Internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch explores the deep forces that shape human language and influence the way we communicate with one another. She explains how your first social internet experience influences whether you prefer "LOL" or "lol," why ~sparkly tildes~ succeeded where centuries of proposals for irony punctuation had failed, what emoji have in common with physical gestures, and how the artfully disarrayed language of animal memes like lolcats and doggo made them more likely to spread. Because Internet is essential reading for anyone who's ever puzzled over how to punctuate a text message or wondered where memes come from. It's the perfect book for understanding how the internet is changing the English language, why that's a good thing, and what our online interactions reveal about who we are"-- Provided by publisher.
"A linguistically informed look at how our digital world is transforming the English language. Language is humanity's most spectacular open-source project, and the internet is making our language change faster and in more interesting ways than ever before. The programmers behind our apps and platforms decide how our conversations are structured, from the grammar of status updates to the protocols of comments and @replies. Linguistically inventive online communities spread new slang and jargon with dizzying speed. What's more, social media is a vast laboratory of unedited, unfiltered words where we can language evolve in real time. Even the most absurd-looking slang has genuine patterns behind it. Internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch explores the deep forces that shape human language and influence the way we communicate with one another. She explains how the year you first accessed the internet determines how you talk online; how ~sparkly tildes~ became widely recognized as sarcasm punctuation; whether emoji are replacing words; and why internet dialects like doge, lolspeak, and snek are linguistically significant. Because Internet is essential reading for anyone who's ever puzzled over how to punctuate a text message or wondered where memes come from. It's the perfect book for understanding how the internet is changing the English language, why that's a good thing, and what our online interactions reveal about who we are"-- Provided by publisher.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2019 June #1
    If linguists are interested in the subconscious patterns behind everyday language, then the unfiltered and "so beautifully mundane" nature of informal internet writing is a boon for insights about how language changes, writes linguist, podcaster, and blogger McCulloch. Compared with speech or handwriting, which are ephemeral and difficult to analyze, the modern digital writing on display in texts, tweets, and memes encourages and allows for easier examination and interpretation. McCulloch writes enthusiastically about how emoji symbolize digital gestures, how chat technologies have changed conversation over time, and how the post–WWII "golden age" of acronyms led to the emergence of "social acronyms" like btw, omg, and lol. There's also a clarifying "Taxonomy of Internet People," which marks internet generations based on the services and skills they used when coming online: "Old Internet People" experienced Usenet, forums, and Listservs, for example, whereas "Full Internet People" came of age with AOL Instant Messenger, MySpace, and blogs. This is an insightful analysis of language and the internet of right now, in-depth yet accessible to any internet generation. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Gretchen McCulloch writes about linguistics for a general audience, especially internet language. She writes the Resident Linguist column at Wired (and formerly at The Toast). McCulloch has a master’s in linguistics from McGill University, runs the blog All Things Linguistic, and cohosts Lingthusiasm, a podcast that’s enthusiastic about linguistics. She lives in Montreal, but also on the internet.

Subject: Language and the Internet.
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Popular Culture.
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Business Communication / General.
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General.
Language and the Internet.

Additional Resources