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Turning 15 on the road to freedom [electronic resource] : my story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March. Lynda Blackmon Lowery.

Electronic resources

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780698151338 (electronic bk)
  • Physical Description: 1 online resource

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.:
A memoir of the Civil Rights Movement from one of its youngest heroes A Sibert Informational Book Medal Honor Book Kirkus Best Books of 2015 Booklist Editors' Choice 2015 BCCB Blue Ribbon 2015 As the youngest marcher in the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Albama, Lynda Blackmon Lowery proved that young adults can be heroes. Jailed nine times before her fifteenth birthday, Lowery fought alongside Martin Luther King, Jr. for the rights of African-Americans. In this memoir, she shows today's young readers what it means to fight nonviolently (even when the police are using violence, as in the Bloody Sunday protest) and how it felt to be part of changing American history. Straightforward and inspiring, this beautifully illustrated memoir brings readers into the middle of the Civil Rights Movement, complementing Common Core classroom learning and bringing history alive for young readers. From the Hardcover edition.
Target Audience Note:
Text Difficulty 3 - Text Difficulty 4
MG/Middle grades (4th-8th)
780 Lexile.
5.1 ATOS Level
Reproduction Note:
Electronic reproduction. New York : Dial Books, 2015. Requires OverDrive Read (file size: N/A KB) or Adobe Digital Editions (file size: 27235 KB) or Kobo app or compatible Kobo device (file size: N/A KB) or Amazon Kindle (file size: N/A KB).
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2015 February #1
    *Starred Review* "By the time I was fifteen years old, I had been in jail nine times." So opens Lowery's account of growing up in Selma, Alabama, during the troubled 1960s, as the African American community struggled for voting rights. At 13, Lynda and other students began slipping out of school to participate in marches. At 14, she was first arrested. After many peaceful protests, Lynda and others marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge into a violent attack by state troopers and sheriffs' deputies on what became known as Bloody Sunday. Though beaten on the head, she returned two weeks later for the march from Selma to Montgomery—and the Voting Rights Act was passed later that year. The plain-spoken language of this memoir makes it all the more moving, while Lowery's detail-rich memories of her community, their shared purpose, and her own experiences make it particularly accessible to young readers. Illustrations include archival photos and original artwork that uses line and color expressively. A concluding page comments that the Supreme Court recently struck down part of the Voting Rights Act, and notes that "who has the right to vote is still being decided today." This inspiring personal story illuminates pivotal events in America's history. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Lynda Blackmon Lowery, the youngest person to take part in the whole Selma to Montgomery March, now works as a case manager at a mental health center, and still lives in Selma, Alabama.

Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley have collaborated on several previous history and geography books for young people. Elspeth lives in Brooklyn, New York, and Susan lives in New York City.

P J Loughran is an illustrator, creative director, and musician. He lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Subject: Young Adult Nonfiction.
Biography & Autobiography.
History.
Sociology.
Genre: Electronic books.

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