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North by Shakespeare : a rogue scholar's quest for the truth behind the Bard's work / Michael Blanding.

Blanding, Michael, (author.).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Moorhead Public Library 822.33 BLA (Text) 33500013386610 New Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780316493246
  • ISBN: 0316493244
  • Physical Description: pages cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Hachette Books, 2021.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary, etc.:
"A work of gripping non-fiction, North by Shakespeare presents the twinning narratives of rogue scholar Dennis McCarthy, called "the Steve Jobs of the Shakespeare community," and Sir Thomas North, an Elizabethan courtier whom McCarthy believes to be the undiscovered source for Shakespeare's plays. For the last fifteen years, Dennis McCarthy has obsessively pursued the true source of Shakespeare's works, with fascinating results. Using plagiarism software, he has found direct links between Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, and other plays and Thomas North's published and unpublished writings-as well as Shakespearean plotlines seemingly lifted straight from North's colorful life. McCarthy's wholly original conclusion is this: Shakespeare wrote the plays, but he adapted them from source plays written by North decades before-many of them penned on behalf of North's patron Robert Dudley, in his efforts to woo Queen Elizabeth. That bold theory answers many lingering questions about the Bard with compelling new evidence, including a newly unearthed journal of North's travels through France and Italy, filled with locations and details appearing in Shakespeare's plays. North by Shakespeare alternates between the dramatic life of Thomas North, the intrigues of the Tudor court, the rivalries of English Renaissance theatre, and academic outsider Dennis McCarthy's attempts to air his provocative ideas in the clubby world of Shakespearean scholarship. Through it all, Blanding employs his keen journalistic eye to craft a highly readable drama, up-ending our understanding of the beloved playwright and his "singular genius.""-- Provided by publisher.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2021 March #1
    In Macbeth's metaphor of life as a speedily exhausted candle, Blanding sees more than Shakespeare's poetic imagination. He sees the unrecognized influence of Thomas North, a sixteenth-century soldier, courtier, attorney, and translator. North's influence on the Bard, Blanding acknowledges, came into his view through Dennis McCarthy, an uncredentialed but zealous scholar who has identified dozens of parallels between North's published works and Shakespeare's plays (including not only Macbeth but also Othello and Hamlet). McCarthy has even speculated that Shakespeare borrowed to the point of plagiarism from lost plays North supposedly wrote. Thus, North's life history becomes for McCarthy an explanation for features of Shakespeare's plays hard to explain as the work of a minimally educated playwright. McCarthy does not join those who have denied Shakespeare's authorship, typically attributing the Bard's works to Francis Bacon or Edward de Vere. However, Blanding interprets McCarthy's views as discernibly similar. Readers not persuaded by McCarthy's theory may still gain from his insights into how guardians of orthodoxy deal with an interloper. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2021 March #1
    In Macbeth's metaphor of life as a speedily exhausted candle, Blanding sees more than Shakespeare's poetic imagination. He sees the unrecognized influence of Thomas North, a sixteenth-century soldier, courtier, attorney, and translator. North's influence on the Bard, Blanding acknowledges, came into his view through Dennis McCarthy, an uncredentialed but zealous scholar who has identified dozens of parallels between North's published works and Shakespeare's plays (including not only Macbeth but also Othello and Hamlet). McCarthy has even speculated that Shakespeare borrowed to the point of plagiarism from lost plays North supposedly wrote. Thus, North's life history becomes for McCarthy an explanation for features of Shakespeare's plays hard to explain as the work of a minimally educated playwright. McCarthy does not join those who have denied Shakespeare's authorship, typically attributing the Bard's works to Francis Bacon or Edward de Vere. However, Blanding interprets McCarthy's views as discernibly similar. Readers not persuaded by McCarthy's theory may still gain from his insights into how guardians of orthodoxy deal with an interloper. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Michael Blanding is a Boston-based investigative journalist, whose work has appeared in The New York Times, WIRED, Slate, The Boston Globe Magazine, Boston magazine, and other publications. He is author of The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps (2014), which was a New York Times bestseller and an NPR Book of the Year; and The Coke Machine: The Dirty Truth Behind the World's Favorite Soft Drink (2010). A former writing fellow at Brandeis University and The Harvard Kennedy School, he has taught feature writing at Tufts University, Emerson College, and GrubStreet Writers.

Subject: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 > Authorship.
Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 > Authorship > North theory.
North, Thomas, Sir, 1535-1601.
North, Thomas, Sir, 1535-1601?
Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616.
Authorship.

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