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The man who lived underground / Richard Wright ; afterword by Malcolm Wright.

Wright, Richard, 1908-1960 (author.). Wright, Richard, 1908-1960 Container of (work) : Memories of my grandmother. (Added Author). Wright, Malcolm, (writer of afterword.).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Barnesville Public Library WRI (Text) 33500013386032 New Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 1598536761
  • ISBN: 9781598536768
  • Physical Description: xii, 228 pages ; 22 cm
  • Publisher: New York : Library of America, [2021]

Content descriptions

General Note:
Published for the first time, by special arrangement with the author's estate.
Includes companion essay Memories of My Grandmother.
Formatted Contents Note:
Prefactory note -- The man who lived underground -- Memories of my grandmother -- Afterword / by Malcolm Wright -- Note on the text.
Summary, etc.:
"Fred Daniels, a Black man, is picked up by the police after a brutal double murder and tortured until he confesses to a crime he did not commit. After signing a confession, he escapes from custody and flees into the city's sewer system."-- Provided by publisher.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2021 March #2
    *Starred Review* It's a fine summer evening; Fred Daniels has just gotten paid; and he's happily heading home to his pregnant wife. But Fred is Black, the cops in the squad car are white; they take him to the station and torture him into confessing to a double murder he knows nothing about. Fred manages to escape down a manhole into the sewer system, where he embarks on a feverish underworld quest, experiencing a wave of epiphanies as he burrows into a Black church, a movie theater, a jewelry shop, an insurance office, and an undertaker, each granting him startling new perceptions of the shackles of racism. Alone in the dark fending for himself, Fred revels in his strange freedom and "high pitch of consciousness," feeling that he is an "invisible man." Wright wrote this mythic, crescendo odyssey, this molten tragedy of tyranny and the destruction of a life, at the start of WWII, 10 years before Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man appeared. But despite the resounding success of Native Son, Wright's publisher rejected this lacerating tale. Now, finally, this devastating inquiry into oppression and delusion, this timeless tour de force, emerges in full, the work Wright was most passionate about, as he explains in the profoundly illuminating essay, "Memories of My Grandmother," also published here for the first time. This blazing literary meteor should land in every collection. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2021 March #2
    *Starred Review* It's a fine summer evening; Fred Daniels has just gotten paid; and he's happily heading home to his pregnant wife. But Fred is Black, the cops in the squad car are white; they take him to the station and torture him into confessing to a double murder he knows nothing about. Fred manages to escape down a manhole into the sewer system, where he embarks on a feverish underworld quest, experiencing a wave of epiphanies as he burrows into a Black church, a movie theater, a jewelry shop, an insurance office, and an undertaker, each granting him startling new perceptions of the shackles of racism. Alone in the dark fending for himself, Fred revels in his strange freedom and "high pitch of consciousness," feeling that he is an "invisible man." Wright wrote this mythic, crescendo odyssey, this molten tragedy of tyranny and the destruction of a life, at the start of WWII, 10 years before Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man appeared. But despite the resounding success of Native Son, Wright's publisher rejected this lacerating tale. Now, finally, this devastating inquiry into oppression and delusion, this timeless tour de force, emerges in full, the work Wright was most passionate about, as he explains in the profoundly illuminating essay, "Memories of My Grandmother," also published here for the first time. This blazing literary meteor should land in every collection. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Richard Wright (1908-1960) is one of the most influential African American writers of the last century. His major works include the story collection Uncle Tom's Children, the novel Native Son, and the autobiography Black Boy/American Hunger.

Subject: African American men > Fiction.
False arrest > Fiction.
Psychological torture > Fiction.
Police misconduct > Fiction.
Racism > Fiction.
Race relations > Fiction.
Dwellings > Fiction.
Sewerage > Fiction.
Genre: Thrillers (Fiction)
Psychological fiction.

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