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The divorce colony : how women revolutionized marriage and found freedom on the American frontier / April White.

White, April, (author.).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Mahnomen Public Library 920 WHI (Text) 33500013620232 New Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780306827662
  • ISBN: 0306827662
  • Physical Description: xv, 286 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Hachette Books, 2022.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
Prologue: "Is marriage a failure?" -- A thriving and interesting place -- In good faith -- Just another -- Budding hope and dead passions -- A savage American -- Ardor and inexpereience -- The campaigns -- Undesirable cattle -- A personal statement -- Let not man put asunder -- A moral superstition free as air -- The sentence -- To be left alone -- Happiness will follow thee -- A tramp and an exile -- Stupid, unjust, monstrous and foolish -- Light in the sky -- Heart -- Epilogue: A rising of ideals.
Summary, etc.:
"From a historian and senior writer and editor at Atlas Obscura, a fascinating account of the daring nineteenth-century women who moved to South Dakota to divorce their husbands and start living on their own terms"-- Provided by publisher.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2022 May #2
    White discusses the phenomenon of migratory divorce in late nineteenth-century Sioux Falls. She focuses on a handful of wealthy white women who sought divorce for reasons ranging from adultery to cruelty to moral turpitude. The South Dakota city had one of the laxer divorce laws in the country, requiring only a 90-day residency. An outspoken bishop, William Hare, was vexed by its reputation as a "Divorce Colony" and succeeded in a campaign to tighten restrictions, eventually expanding the residency requirement to a year. By the 1930s, Nevada, particularly Reno, had supplanted Sioux Falls as the go-to destination for a quickie divorce. More and more women refused to forsake their own happiness or settle for a partnership in which they were subjugated, which was reflected in the country's booming divorce rate. The author acknowledges that Black women in particular had only recently been granted a legal right to a recognized marriage, and the right to divorce remained out of reach for those without financial means. Despite the book's somewhat rarified scope, this is a valuable and intriguing contribution to American social history. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2022 May #2
    White discusses the phenomenon of migratory divorce in late nineteenth-century Sioux Falls. She focuses on a handful of wealthy white women who sought divorce for reasons ranging from adultery to cruelty to moral turpitude. The South Dakota city had one of the laxer divorce laws in the country, requiring only a 90-day residency. An outspoken bishop, William Hare, was vexed by its reputation as a "Divorce Colony" and succeeded in a campaign to tighten restrictions, eventually expanding the residency requirement to a year. By the 1930s, Nevada, particularly Reno, had supplanted Sioux Falls as the go-to destination for a quickie divorce. More and more women refused to forsake their own happiness or settle for a partnership in which they were subjugated, which was reflected in the country's booming divorce rate. The author acknowledges that Black women in particular had only recently been granted a legal right to a recognized marriage, and the right to divorce remained out of reach for those without financial means. Despite the book's somewhat rarified scope, this is a valuable and intriguing contribution to American social history. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

April White is a senior writer and editor at Atlas Obscura. She previously worked as an editor at Smithsonian Magazine. She holds a master’s degree in history and her work has appeared in publications including the Washington Post, The Atavist Magazine, and JSTOR Daily, where she wrote a regular column on the history of food,. She lives in Washington, DC.

April White is a senior writer and editor at Atlas Obscura. She previously worked as an editor at Smithsonian Magazine. She holds a master’s degree in history and her work has appeared in publications including the Washington Post, The Atavist Magazine, and JSTOR Daily, where she wrote a regular column on the history of food,. She lives in Washington, DC.

Subject: Divorce > South Dakota > Sioux Falls > History > 19th century.
Divorce > Law and legislation > South Dakota > Sioux Falls.
Divorced women > United States > Biography.
Married women > Legal status, laws, etc. > United States.
Women > United States > Social conditions.
Sioux Falls (S.D.) > History.
United States > Social conditions > 1865-1918.
Divorce.
Divorce > Law and legislation.
Divorced women.
Married women > Legal status, laws, etc.
Social conditions.
Women > Social conditions.
South Dakota > Sioux Falls.
United States.
Genre: Biographies.
History.

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