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Available copies

  • 0 of 3 copies available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 0 of 2 copies available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

2 current holds with 3 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Climax Public Library WIG (Text) 33500013636618 New In transit -
Mahnomen Public Library WIG (Text) 33500013636600 New Checked out 08/26/2022
Thief River Falls Public Library WIG (Text) 35500006605396 New In transit -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781416571261
  • ISBN: 1416571264
  • Physical Description: 528 pages ; 24 cm
  • Edition: First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, 2022.

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.:
Fifteen years after the publication of Evidence of Things Unseen, National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize finalist Marianne Wiggins returns with a novel destined to be an American classic: a sweeping masterwork set during World War II about the meaning of family and the limitations of the American dream. Rockwell "Rocky" Rhodes has spent years fiercely protecting his California ranch from the LA Water Corporation. It is here where he and his beloved wife, Lou, raised their twins, Sunny and Stryker, and it is here where Rocky has mourned Lou in the years since her death. As Sunny and Stryker reach the cusp of adulthood, the country teeters on the brink of war. Stryker decides to join the fight, deploying to Pearl Harbor not long before the bombs strike. Soon, Rocky and his family find themselves facing yet another incomprehensible tragedy. Rocky is determined to protect his remaining family and the land where they've loved and lost so much. But when the government decides to build a Japanese American internment camp next to the ranch, Rocky realizes that the land faces even bigger threats than the LA watermen he's battled for years. Complicating matters is the fact that the idealistic Department of the Interior man assigned to build the camp, who only begins to understand the horror of his task after it may be too late, becomes infatuated with Sunny and entangled with the Rhodes family. Properties of Thirst is a novel that is both universal and intimate. It is the story of a changing American landscape and an examination of one of the darkest periods in this country's past, told through the stories of the individual loves and losses that weave together to form the fabric of our shared history. Ultimately, it is an unflinching distillation of our nation's essence--and a celebration of the bonds of love and family that persist against all odds.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2022 May #2
    *Starred Review* "The first property of thirst is an element of surprise." Wiggins names ten more unexpected and evocative properties over the course of this grand novel of principled and creative individuals caught in the vise of history. Twins Cas and Rocky Rhodes fled their ill-gotten world of privilege. Cas became an innovative, internationally renowned harpist. A disciple of Thoreau and Emerson, Rocky settled in Owens Valley, California, establishing the Three Chairs Ranch, pursing endless battles over water rights, marrying a French immigrant doctor and accomplished cook, and having twins, Sunny and Stryker. When their mother dies, Cas gives up her cosmopolitan life to help Rocky raise them. Sunny grows up to run a restaurant in tiny Lone Pine that draws the Hollywood crowd. Mischief incarnate, Stryker flees trouble by enlisting and lands in Pearl Harbor. Schiff, a smart, caring Jewish lawyer from Chicago working for the Department of the Interior, is sent to Owens Valley, appalled by his assignment to establish a Japanese American internment camp. Virtuoso Wiggins' ninth novel is an expansive, gloriously symphonic, intricately patterned (if at times exceedingly detailed) tale of racism, civil disobedience, nature's glory, art's radiance, and the imperative to save what you love. Loss, desire, moral dilemmas, reflection, and zesty dialogue with the do-good energy of Frank Capra films generate a WWII home front tale of profound and far-ranging inquiry and imagination, scintillating humor, intrepid romance, and conscience. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2022 May #2
    *Starred Review* "The first property of thirst is an element of surprise." Wiggins names ten more unexpected and evocative properties over the course of this grand novel of principled and creative individuals caught in the vise of history. Twins Cas and Rocky Rhodes fled their ill-gotten world of privilege. Cas became an innovative, internationally renowned harpist. A disciple of Thoreau and Emerson, Rocky settled in Owens Valley, California, establishing the Three Chairs Ranch, pursing endless battles over water rights, marrying a French immigrant doctor and accomplished cook, and having twins, Sunny and Stryker. When their mother dies, Cas gives up her cosmopolitan life to help Rocky raise them. Sunny grows up to run a restaurant in tiny Lone Pine that draws the Hollywood crowd. Mischief incarnate, Stryker flees trouble by enlisting and lands in Pearl Harbor. Schiff, a smart, caring Jewish lawyer from Chicago working for the Department of the Interior, is sent to Owens Valley, appalled by his assignment to establish a Japanese American internment camp. Virtuoso Wiggins' ninth novel is an expansive, gloriously symphonic, intricately patterned (if at times exceedingly detailed) tale of racism, civil disobedience, nature's glory, art's radiance, and the imperative to save what you love. Loss, desire, moral dilemmas, reflection, and zesty dialogue with the do-good energy of Frank Capra films generate a WWII home front tale of profound and far-ranging inquiry and imagination, scintillating humor, intrepid romance, and conscience. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Marianne Wiggins is the author of eight novels including John Dollar and Evidence of Things Unseen, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award. She has won a Whiting Award, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, the Heidinger Kafka Prize, and was shortlisted for the Women's Prize for Fiction. She lives in Venice, California.

Subject: World War, 1939-1945 > United States > Fiction.
Ranches > California > Fiction.
Internment camps > California > Fiction.
Ranchers > California > Fiction.
Ranch life > California > Fiction.
Families > California > Fiction.
Internment camps > United States > Fiction.
Japanese Americans > Forced removal and internment, 1942-1945 > Fiction.
California > Fiction.
Genre: Historical fiction.

Additional Resources