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I want to die but I want to eat tteokbokki / Baek Sehee ; translated from the Korean by Anton Hur.

Paek, Se-hŭi, 1990- (author.). Hur, Anton, (translator.).

Available copies

  • 0 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 0 of 1 copy available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

1 current hold with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Detroit Lakes Public Library 921 BAE (Text) 33500013711635 New Checked out 12/30/2022

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781635579383
  • ISBN: 1635579384
  • Physical Description: vii, 160 pages ; 25 cm
  • Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury, [2022]

Content descriptions

General Note:
Original Korean edition published 2018.
Formatted Contents Note:
Prologue -- Slightly depressed -- Am I a pathological liar? -- I'm under constant surveillance -- My desire to become special isn't special at all -- The Goddamn self-esteem -- What should I do to know myself better? -- Regulating, judging, being disappointed, leaving -- Medication side effects -- Obsession with appearances and histrionic personality disorder -- Why do you like me? Will you still like me if I do this? Or this? -- I don't look pretty -- Rock bottom -- Epilogue: it's okay, those who don't face darkness can never appreciate the light -- Psychiatist's note: from one incompleteness to another -- Postscript: reflections of life following therapy.
Summary, etc.:
Baek Sehee is a successful young social media director at a publishing house when she begins seeing a psychiatrist about her - what to call it? - depression? She feels persistently low, anxious, endlessly self-doubting, but also highly judgemental of others. She hides her feelings well at work and with friends; adept at performing the calmness, even ease, her lifestyle demands. The effort is exhausting, overwhelming, and keeps her from forming deep relationships. This can't be normal. But if she's so hopeless, why can she always summon a desire for her favourite street food, the hot, spicy rice cake, tteokbokki? Is this just what life is like? Recording her dialogues with her psychiatrist over a 12-week period, Baek begins to disentangle the feedback loops, knee-jerk reactions and harmful behaviours that keep her locked in a cycle of self-abuse.
Language Note:
In English, translated from Korean.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2022 October #1
    The cover boasts a recommendation from global phenom BTS's leader RM. The PR materials tout its "runaway best-seller" status in its native South Korea, where mental illness remains stigmatized in a country with one of the world's highest suicide rates. As a twentysomething social media director in publishing, Baek "seem[ed] totally fine on the outside but [was] rotting on the inside." Diagnosed with dysthymia—"a state of constant, light ­depression"—Baek sought therapy. She distills her experiences into 12 chapters of transcribed sessions with her psychiatrist, augmented with reflections and revelations about her damaging relationships with family, lovers, colleagues, friends, her impossible standards of beauty, her judgmental self-esteem. Near book's end, her psychiatrist adds an affecting chapter about "ordinary, incomplete" people. Tteokbokki, by the way, is a Korean comfort food comprised of rice cakes and hot sauce. With candor and humor, Baek offers readers and herself resonant moments of empathy: "my hope is for people to read this book and think, I wasn't the only person who felt like this." Originally published in 2018, this arrives in the U.S. sensitively English-enabled by favored translator Hur. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2022 October #1
    The cover boasts a recommendation from global phenom BTS's leader RM. The PR materials tout its "runaway best-seller" status in its native South Korea, where mental illness remains stigmatized in a country with one of the world's highest suicide rates. As a twentysomething social media director in publishing, Baek "seem[ed] totally fine on the outside but [was] rotting on the inside." Diagnosed with dysthymia—"a state of constant, light ­depression"—Baek sought therapy. She distills her experiences into 12 chapters of transcribed sessions with her psychiatrist, augmented with reflections and revelations about her damaging relationships with family, lovers, colleagues, friends, her impossible standards of beauty, her judgmental self-esteem. Near book's end, her psychiatrist adds an affecting chapter about "ordinary, incomplete" people. Tteokbokki, by the way, is a Korean comfort food comprised of rice cakes and hot sauce. With candor and humor, Baek offers readers and herself resonant moments of empathy: "my hope is for people to read this book and think, I wasn't the only person who felt like this." Originally published in 2018, this arrives in the U.S. sensitively English-enabled by favored translator Hur. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Born in 1990, Baek Sehee studied creative writing in college before working for five years at a publishing house. For ten years, she received psychiatric treatment for dysthymia (persistent mild depression), which became the subject of her essays, and then I Want to Die, but I Want to Eat Tteokbokki. Her favorite food is tteokbokki, and she lives with her rescue dog, Jaram.

Anton Hur was born in Stockholm, Sweden. He is the winner of a PEN Translates grant and a PEN/Heim Translation Fund grant, among many others, and his translations include Kyung-Sook Shin's Violets, Bora Chung's Cursed Bunny, and Sang Young Park's Love in the Big City.

Subject: Depressed persons > Interviews.
Depression, Mental > Treatment.
Depressed persons > Counseling of.
Mental health counseling.
Depressed persons.
Mental health counseling.
Genre: Interviews.
Essays.
Interviews.

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