Catalog

Record Details

Catalog Search



Available copies

  • 0 of 3 copies available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 0 of 2 copies available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

1 current hold with 3 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Hawley Public Library 305.8009 COA (Text) 33500013286406 Main Checked out 10/17/2020
Moorhead Public Library 305.8009 COA (Text) 33500013286414 Main Checked out 11/14/2020
Thief River Falls Public Library 305.8009 COA (Text) 35500005683840 Main Checked out 10/27/2020

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780812993547 (hardcover)
  • ISBN: 0812993543 (hardcover)
  • Physical Description: 152 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Spiegel & Grau, [2015]

Content descriptions

Formatted Contents Note:
Prologue : the talk -- PART 1. BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME. The changes -- The second change : Malcolm and the body -- The third change : Mecca and the death of mythology -- PART 2. THE SOOTY DETAILS OF THE SCENE. The fourth change : New York and the death of mercy -- The fifth change : Gettysburg and the long war -- The sixth change : Chicago and the streets -- PART 3. A GRASSY CLEARING. The seventh change : eyes open to the world -- The eighth change : the blast -- Epilogue : into the world.
Summary, etc.:
"For Ta-Nehisi Coates, history has always been personal. At every stage of his life, he's sought in his explorations of history answers to the mysteries that surrounded him -- most urgently, why he, and other black people he knew, seemed to live in fear. What were they afraid of? In Tremble for My Country, Coates takes readers along on his journey through America's history of race and its contemporary resonances through a series of awakenings -- moments when he discovered some new truth about our long, tangled history of race, whether through his myth-busting professors at Howard University, a trip to a Civil War battlefield with a rogue historian, a journey to Chicago's South Side to visit aging survivors of 20th century America's 'long war on black people,' or a visit with the mother of a beloved friend who was shot down by the police. In his trademark style -- a mix of lyrical personal narrative, reimagined history, essayistic argument, and reportage -- Coates provides readers a thrillingly illuminating new framework for understanding race: its history, our contemporary dilemma, and where we go from here"-- Provided by publisher.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2015 August #1
    *Starred Review* In this brief book, which takes the form of a letter to the author's teenage son, Coates, the justly acclaimed author of the family memoir The Beautiful Struggle (2008), comes to grips with what it means to be black in America today. On the basis of his previous writing, Coates is the ideal candidate to even attempt such an ambitious undertaking. He has become an extraordinary essayist; that he succeeds here will rank him securely among his forerunners. The title is from a quotation by Richard Wright; the chief literary influence is James Baldwin; Coates' personal inspiration is Malcolm X; the crucible of the piece is Howard University; and behind it are the writings and attitudes handed down by Coates' father, publisher Paul Coates. Like Baldwin, Coates is both furious and judicious. When he took his son to visit Civil War battlefields, he felt as though he was "a nosy accountant conducting an audit and someone was trying to hide the books." In the days after 9/11, Coates could not help seeing the celebrated police as no different from those who had recently killed a Howard classmate. And he desperately wants his son to know (as his father taught him) that American history too often equates with robbery, and its complacent boosters are hypocritical at best. There is awesome beauty in the power of his prose and vital truth on every page. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent for The Atlantic. His book Between the World and Me won the National Book Award in 2015. Coates is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship. He lives in New York City with his wife and son.

Subject: United States > Race relations.
Race discrimination > United States.
African Americans > Social conditions.
African Americans > Public opinion.
Whites > United States > Attitudes.
BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Personal Memoirs.
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Discrimination & Race Relations.
HISTORY / United States / General.
Genre: Biographies.
Bildungsromans.

Additional Resources