Catalog

Updates ahead! We will be updating our catalog on Sunday, October 20, which means availability will be limited from 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Record Details

Catalog Search



Doing harm : the truth about how bad medicine and lazy science leave women dismissed, misdiagnosed, and sick / Maya Dusenbery.

Dusenbery, Maya, author. (Author).
Image of item

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Moorhead Public Library 613.0424 DUS (Text) 33500012679478 Main Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780062470805
  • ISBN: 0062470809
  • Physical Description: 390 pages ; 24 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York, NY : HarperOne, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2018]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 323-377) and index.
Formatted Contents Note: Part 1. Overlooked and dismissed: a systemic problem -- The knowledge gap -- The trust gap -- Part 2. Invisible women in a "male model" system -- Heart disease and other life-threatening emergencies -- Autoimmune disease and the long search for a diagnosis -- Part 3. Neglected diseases: the disorders formerly known as hysteria -- Chronic pain: "pain is real when you get other people to believe in it" -- The curse of Eve: when being sick is "normal" -- Contested illnesses: when diseases are "fashionable" -- Conclusion.
Summary, etc.: "In this shocking, hard-hitting expose in the tradition of Naomi Klein and Barbara Ehrenreich, the editorial director of Feministing.com, reveals how gender bias infects every level of medicine and healthcare today--leading to inadequate, inappropriate, and even dangerous treatment that threatens women's lives and well-being. Modern medicine is failing women. Half of all American women suffer from at least one chronic health condition--from autoimmune disorders and asthma to depression and Alzheimer's disease--and the numbers are increasing. A wealth of research has revealed that women often exhibit different symptoms than their male counterparts, suffer disproportionately from many debilitating conditions, and may react differently to prescription drugs and other therapies. Yet more than twenty years after the law decreed that women be included in all health-related research and drug development, doctors are still operating with a lingering knowledge gap when it comes to women's health. And they're not immune to unconscious biases and stereotypes that can undermine the doctor-patient relationship. The consequences can be catastrophic: too often, women are misdiagnosed, poorly treated, and find their complaints dismissed as 'just stress' or 'all in your head.' Meanwhile, they're getting sicker. Maya Dusenbery brings together scientific and sociological research, interviews with experts within and outside the medical establishment, and personal stories from regular women to provide the first comprehensive, accessible look at how sexism in medicine harms women today. In addition to offering a clear-eyed explanation of the root causes of this insidious and entrenched bias and laying out its effects, she suggests concrete steps we can take to cure it. Eye-opening and long-overdue, Doing Harm is an empowering call to action for health care providers and all women"-- Provided by publisher.
Half of all American women suffer from at least one chronic health condition-- and the numbers are increasing. Women often exhibit different symptoms than their male counterparts, suffer disproportionately from many debilitating conditions, and may react differently to prescription drugs and other therapies ... and doctors are still operating with a knowledge gap when it comes to women's health. Dusenbery offers a clear-eyed explanation of the root causes of this insidious and entrenched bias, and suggests concrete steps we can take to cure it.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2018 February #2
    In this medical manifesto, Dusenbery, editorial director of Feministing.com, empowers women, telling them to trust their instincts, get second opinions, and refuse to settle for one-size-fits-all health care. Why should so many studies be conducted just on men? After all, many conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and chronic fatigue syndrome, disproportionately affect females. In 2014, only 21 percent of full professors and 16 percent of deans at U.S. medical schools were women. Well-meaning and not-so-well-meaning doctors cause harm, bringing their biases to their diagnoses. When one black teenager told her gynecologist she would continue using condoms, he "prescribed prenatal vitamins, saying it was obvious she'd be pregnant soon," says Dusenbery. In one survey, nearly half of female patients with autoimmune diseases said they were initially dismissed as "chronic complainers." Too often doctors chalk up abdominal pain to menstruation, including cases of one woman with colon cancer and others with endometriosis. Dusenbery urges female patients to be more confident and their doctors to be less dismissive. "Believe us when we say we're sick," she writes. Good advice that may be easier said than done. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

Subject: Women > Health and hygiene > Research.
Women > Health and hygiene > Sociological aspects.
Sexism in medicine.
Health education.
HEALTH & FITNESS > Women's Health.
SOCIAL SCIENCE > Women's Studies.
MEDICAL > Health Care Delivery.
Health education.
Sexism in medicine.
Women > Health and hygiene > Research.
Women > Health and hygiene > Sociological aspects.
HEALTH & FITNESS / Women's Health.
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Women's Studies.
MEDICAL / Health Care Delivery.

Additional Resources