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I was their American dream : a graphic memoir / Malaka Gharib ; coloring by Toby Leigh.

Gharib, Malaka, author , illustrator. (Author). Leigh, Toby, colourist. (Added Author).
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Available copies

  • 2 of 2 copies available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 2 of 2 copies available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 2 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Breckenridge Public Library G 921 GHA (Text) 33500013072137 New Available -
Moorhead Public Library G 921 GHA (Text) 33500013072145 New Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 0525575111
  • ISBN: 9780525575115
  • Physical Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : chiefly color illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Clarkson Potter, [2019]

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.: "I Was Their American Dream is at once a coming-of-age story and a reminder of the thousands of immigrants who come to America in search for a better life for themselves and their children. The daughter of parents with unfulfilled dreams themselves, Malaka navigated her childhood chasing her parents' ideals, learning to code-switch between her family's Filipino and Egyptian customs, adapting to white culture to fit in, crushing on skater boys, and trying to understand the tension between holding onto cultural values and trying to be an all-American kid. Malaka Gharib's triumphant graphic memoir brings to life her teenage antics and illuminates earnest questions about identity and culture, while providing thoughtful insight into the lives of modern immigrants and the generation of millennial children they raised. Malaka's story is a heartfelt tribute to the American immigrants who have invested their future in the promise of the American dream."--Amazon.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2019 March #2
    Gharib's Catholic mother regretted leaving her upper-middle-class Manila life, but unrest fueled by the 1970s Marcos regime sent her stateside. Meanwhile, her Egyptian Muslim father "had been scheming to get to America since high school" and finally enrolled at UCLA's School of Management. They met working at a hotel, married six months later, and had Gharib one year after. Divorce happened, with Gharib predominantly raised in Northern California by her overworked mother and her multigenerational extended family. Growing up, "Filipino-Egyptians were kinda rare," and by 16, she "just [knew] that white > whatever the hell I was." Gharib's coming-of-age is a formidable balancing act negotiating parents, cultures, religions, and expectations; not until adulthood can she begin to assert "the Real Me." Presenting her memories in hues of pinks, oranges, and blues, Gharib augments them with stinging, comically poignant interruptions, including a Malaka cut-out doll to be dressed to "dramatically transform and alter her personality" and "Microagressions Bingo" with squares that call out daily racist incidents. Forthright and funny, Gharib fiercely claims her own American dream. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

MALAKA GHARIB is an artist, journalist, and writer based in Washington, D.C. She is the founder of The Runcible Spoon, a food zine, and the co-founder of the D.C. Art Book Fair. She lives in a row house with her husband Darren and her 9-year-old rice cooker.

Subject: Gharib, Malaka > Comic books, strips, etc.
Immigrants > United States > Biography > Comic books, strips, etc.
Racially mixed people > United States > Biography > Comic books, strips, etc.
Filipino Americans > Biography > Comic books, strips, etc.
Egyptian Americans > Biography > Comic books, strips, etc.
American Dream > Comic books, strips, etc.
Personality and culture > Comic books, strips, etc.
Identity (Philosophical concept) > Comic books, strips, etc.
American Dream.
Immigrants.
United States.
United States.
Genre: Biographical comics.
Graphic novels.
Comic books, strips, etc.
Graphic novels.

Additional Resources