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  • 0 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
McIntosh Public Library 306.8508 PER (Text) 33500013137559 New Checked out 12/17/2019

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780807076552
  • ISBN: 0807076554
  • Physical Description: 163 pages ; 19 cm
  • Publisher: Boston, Massachusetts : Beacon Press, [2019]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references.
Summary, etc.:
"Explores the terror, grace, and beauty of coming of age as a Black person in contemporary America and what it means to parent our children in a persistently unjust world. Emotionally raw and deeply reflective, Imani Perry issues an unflinching challenge to society to see Black children as deserving of humanity. She admits fear and frustration for her African American sons in a society that is increasingly racist and at times seems irredeemable. However, as a mother, feminist, writer, and intellectual, Perry offers an unfettered expression of love--finding beauty and possibility in life--and she exhorts her children and their peers to find the courage to chart their own paths and find steady footing and inspiration in Black tradition. Perry draws upon the ideas of figures such as James Baldwin, W. E. B. DuBois, Emily Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Ida B. Wells. She shares vulnerabilities and insight from her own life and from encounters in places as varied as the West Side of Chicago; Birmingham, Alabama; and New England prep schools. Breathe offers a broader meditation on race, gender, and the meaning of a life well lived and is also an unforgettable lesson in Black resistance and resilience"-- Provided by publisher.
"Emotionally raw and deeply reflective, Imani Perry issues an unflinching challenge to society to see Black children as deserving of humanity. She admits fear and frustration for her African American sons in a society that is increasingly racist and at times seems irredeemable. However, as a mother, feminist, writer, and intellectual, Perry offers an unfettered expression of love--finding beauty and possibility in life--and she exhorts her children and their peers to find the courage to chart their own paths and find steady footing and inspiration in Black tradition. Perry draws upon the ideas of figures such as James Baldwin, W. E. B. DuBois, Emily Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Ida B. Wells. She shares vulnerabilities and insight from her own life and from encounters in places as varied as the West Side of Chicago; Birmingham, Alabama; and New England prep schools. Breathe offers a broader meditation on race, gender, and the meaning of a life well lived and is also an unforgettable lesson in Black resistance and resilience"-- Provided by publisher.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2019 June #1
    *Starred Review* Perry, a Princeton professor and author of the award-winning Looking for Lorraine (2018), presents, in the tradition of W. E. B. DuBois, James Baldwin, and Ta-Nehisi Coates, a letter to her two sons, and to all Black boys, encouraging them to stand back up in the face of stumbling. Voiced the way an African American mom might say it when whites are not around, and told against the backdrop of police killings of Black men (notably Eric Garner, whose words "I can't breathe" ring in the title), Perry's missive may echo a general American regret about the mismatch between Black crime and punishment. Perry shares well-told and funny memories of family trips to Alabama, Chicago, and Cambridge, which signal heritage and privilege, and innumerable gems from Black cultural thinkers on perseverance. This mother's striking and generous admonition to thrive even in the face of white mendacity also is a meditation on parenting. Reflective insights about injustice adjoin a few visceral apologies about every responsible parent's regrets, which might remind parents of the divide between "the deed of giving life" and "the social consequence of the deed." For Black boys and their parents who struggle to get childhood and mothering-along or fathering-along correct: "Just always remember: even if you tumble . . . you must move towards freedom." Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Imani Perry is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, where she also teaches in the Programs in Law and Public Affairs, and in Gender and Sexuality Studies. She is a native of Birmingham, Alabama, and spent much of her youth in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Chicago. She is the author of several books, including Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry. She lives outside Philadelphia with her two sons, Freeman Diallo Perry Rabb and Issa Garner Rabb. Connect with her on Twitter (@imaniperry).

Subject: Perry, Imani, 1972-
African American mothers > Biography.
African American educators > Biography.
African American families.
African American boys > Social conditions.
African Americans > Social conditions.
Racism > United States.
United States > Race relations.

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