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Under the sky we make : how to be human in a warming world / Kimberly Nicholas, PhD.

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Detroit Lakes Public Library 304.25 NIC (Text) 33500013380936 New Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780593328170
  • ISBN: 0593328175
  • Physical Description: viii, 324 pages ; 21 cm
  • Publisher: New York : G.P. Putnam's Sons, [2021]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary, etc.:
"...[offers] a hopeful, clear-eyed, and somehow also hilarious guide to effecting real change, starting in our own lives. Saving ourselves from climate apocalypse will require radical shifts within each of us, to effect real change in our society and culture."-- Publisher's description.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2021 March #1
    *Starred Review* This compelling book about climate change really packs a punch, because climate scientist Nicholas relentlessly brings things down to the personal level. Remember your favorite vacation spots as a child? They're probably disappearing, if not already gone. Have a favorite wine? Warmer weather affects growing seasons, so there go your grapes. She spends the first part of her engaging discourse on the facts: change is coming. Part two extols readers to get angry, and to let that anger fuel action. The third part is all about solutions. Nicholas explores carbon creation and consumption, and argues that every human on the planet has the right to their fair share. She tackles governments, the fossil fuel industry, and everyday carbon-elite lifestyles. Basically, she urges readers to stop using so much stuff. No more flying, driving, or eating meat would help, too, and she provides sobering data and personal examples that make these options seem reasonable. The chapter on processed food condemns human disregard for other life forms and natural resources, as Nicholas urges respect for nature and our planet. Libraries wondering if they really need another title on climate change should rest reassured; this is a realistic, accessible, and clarion call for change. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2021 March #1
    *Starred Review* This compelling book about climate change really packs a punch, because climate scientist Nicholas relentlessly brings things down to the personal level. Remember your favorite vacation spots as a child? They're probably disappearing, if not already gone. Have a favorite wine? Warmer weather affects growing seasons, so there go your grapes. She spends the first part of her engaging discourse on the facts: change is coming. Part two extols readers to get angry, and to let that anger fuel action. The third part is all about solutions. Nicholas explores carbon creation and consumption, and argues that every human on the planet has the right to their fair share. She tackles governments, the fossil fuel industry, and everyday carbon-elite lifestyles. Basically, she urges readers to stop using so much stuff. No more flying, driving, or eating meat would help, too, and she provides sobering data and personal examples that make these options seem reasonable. The chapter on processed food condemns human disregard for other life forms and natural resources, as Nicholas urges respect for nature and our planet. Libraries wondering if they really need another title on climate change should rest reassured; this is a realistic, accessible, and clarion call for change. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

Dr. Kimberly Nicholas is Associate Professor of Sustainability Science at Lund, Sweden's highest-ranked university. Born and raised on her family's vineyard in Sonoma, California, she studied the effect of climate change on the California wine industry for her PhD in Environment and Resources at Stanford University. Since then, she has published over 50 articles on climate and sustainability in leading peer-reviewed journals, and her research has been featured in outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, USA Today, Buzzfeed and more. She has also been profiled in Elle and The Guardian, and gives appearances at around 50 lectures each year, such as the recent Climate Change Leadership summit.

Subject: Climatic changes > Effect of human beings on.
Climatic changes > Social aspects.
Climate change mitigation > Social aspects.

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