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Available copies

  • 0 of 2 copies available at LARL/NWRL Consortium.
  • 0 of 2 copies available at Lake Agassiz Regional Library. (Show preferred library)

Current holds

1 current hold with 2 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Detroit Lakes Public Library G MCP (Text) 33500013423462 New Checked out 08/14/2021
Moorhead Public Library G MCP (Text) 33500013423470 New On holds shelf -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780358345541
  • ISBN: 0358345545
  • Physical Description: 267 pages : chiefly illustrations (some color) ; 27 x 21 cm
  • Publisher: New York, New York : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 2021.

Content descriptions

General Note:
Author from front cover.
Summary, etc.:
"Nick, a young illustrator, can't connect with people. Whether it's the barista down the street, his own family, or Wren, an oncologist whose life becomes painfully tangled with his, Nick can't shake the feeling that there is some hidden realm of human interaction beyond his reach. He staggers through meaningless conversations and haunts lookalike vacuous coffee shops in the hope that he will find it there. But it isn't until Nick learns to stop performing and speak about the things that really matter that the complex and colorful worlds of the people he meets are finally revealed to him."--Back cover.
Reviews

  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2021 March #2
    Wiry young illustrator Nick is feeling the opposite of this book's title. He's out of sync in his interactions with others, and even with his own desires and experiences. Obsessed with trying to stay present in his life and with finding true communication, he yearns to speak words that matter with his mom, his sister, his new love interest, his plumber. McPhail's delicately lined graphite drawings (he's a frequent cartoonist for the New Yorker), neatly squared into comics-y frames, are playful yet full of depth. The same could be said for Nick's story, though it takes a dark turn that forces him to find what matters in a different way. When Nick achieves epiphanic moments of conversational connection, McPhail's art bursts into dreamlike, painterly, full-color panels: Nick scaling a glacier, facing a waterfall, or sitting in the audience of a surgical theater. Impressive art, a relatable hero's struggle, and a healthy dose of humor (Nick haunts establishments with names like Your Friends Have Kids Bar and Gentrificchiato) will make McPhail's graphic novel debut appealing to many. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2021 March #2
    Wiry young illustrator Nick is feeling the opposite of this book's title. He's out of sync in his interactions with others, and even with his own desires and experiences. Obsessed with trying to stay present in his life and with finding true communication, he yearns to speak words that matter with his mom, his sister, his new love interest, his plumber. McPhail's delicately lined graphite drawings (he's a frequent cartoonist for the New Yorker), neatly squared into comics-y frames, are playful yet full of depth. The same could be said for Nick's story, though it takes a dark turn that forces him to find what matters in a different way. When Nick achieves epiphanic moments of conversational connection, McPhail's art bursts into dreamlike, painterly, full-color panels: Nick scaling a glacier, facing a waterfall, or sitting in the audience of a surgical theater. Impressive art, a relatable hero's struggle, and a healthy dose of humor (Nick haunts establishments with names like Your Friends Have Kids Bar and Gentrificchiato) will make McPhail's graphic novel debut appealing to many. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.

Author Notes

WILL MCPHAIL has been contributing cartoons, sketchbooks, and humor pieces to the New Yorker since 2014. He was the winner of the Reuben Award for cartooning in 2017 and 2018. He lives in Edinburgh, Scotland.

WILL MCPHAIL has been contributing cartoons, sketchbooks, and humor pieces to the New Yorker since 2014. He was the winner of the Reuben Award for cartooning in 2017 and 2018. He lives in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Subject: Illustrators > Comic books, strips, etc.
Interpersonal relations > Comic books, strips, etc.
Man-woman relationships > Comic books, strips, etc.
Man-woman relationships.
Interpersonal relations.
Illustrators.
Genre: Comics (Graphic works)
Graphic novels.
Graphic novels.
Comics (Graphic works)

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